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Not Like Me

Welcome to the blog tour for the book Not Like Me by Eric Bryant.

About the Book:

From Amazon.com:

We live in a diverse world filled with unprecedented opportunity. According to author Eric Michael Bryant in Not Like Me, formerly titled Peppermint-Filled Pinatas, we can become agents of change creating genuine unity among people from a variety of backgrounds and belief systems through our relationships. Through humorous stories and pointed insights gleaned from Eric's own personal experiences and failures, the experiences of others, and the life and teachings of Jesus, you will discover how to move beyond ethnic, racial, cultural, or ideological barriers towards genuine friendship with others. In our nation, an 'uncivil war' is raging. Liberals call for racial reconciliation and tolerance while conservatives tend to hide from our pluralistic world or fight against it. None of these approaches will last. We need to create a new future that connects to God's heart. We can remove the religious baggage of Christianity to discover the world Jesus intended. Followers of Christ will be inspired to actively engage the world in order to overcome stereotypes placed upon us and influence those who have not been interested in Jesus because of these stereotypes. In addition, spiritual seekers will find that when stripped away from the religion created around him, Jesus' dream for our world is remarkable and refreshing. In this new world, we can discover how to resolve conflict, overcome bitterness, create a better future, develop diverse communities, and enjoy our diverse world. Not Like Me also includes a brief article after each chapter with practical ways to apply the principles presented in that chapter. The contributors include: Ed Stetzer, Amena Brown, Margaret Feinberg, Kevin Harney, Dr. Gerardo Marti, Kim Martinez, Lon Wong, Mark DeYmaz, Princess Zulu, Dan Kimball, and Erwin McManus (Foreword).

Pattie's Thoughts:

I chose to be in this blog tour because the author got his D.Min. from Bethel Seminary, which is where my husband got his D.Min. Also, one of my husband's seminars was taught by Erwin McManus of Mosaic, and he wrote the forward to this book.

I have to be honest, I have not yet finished the book. However, it's really good so far. The main point of the first part of the book is this: To reach others for Jesus, we must love them. We must befriend them and love them and woo them to Christ--not throw tracts at them or speak Christianese at them. This often entails stepping out of our comfort zones.

I will be passing this book on to my husband, and when he's finished, we'll pass it along to other friends.

You can purchase the book from Amazon here, and learn about the author here.

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